Product Description

Model Selection

       ZD Leader has a wide range of micro motor production lines in the industry, including DC Motor, AC Motor, Brushless Motor, Planetary Gear Motor, Drum Motor, Planetary Gearbox, RV Reducer and Harmonic Gearbox etc. Through technical innovation and customization, we help you create outstanding application systems and provide flexible solutions for various industrial automation situations.

• Model Selection
Our professional sales representive and technical team will choose the right model and transmission solutions for your usage depend on your specific parameters.

• Drawing Request

If you need more product parameters, catalogues, CAD or 3D drawings, please contact us.
 

• On Your Need

We can modify standard products or customize them to meet your specific needs.

Product Parameters


Planetary Gear Motor

MOTOR FRAME SIZE 32 mm / 42mm / 52mm / 62mm / 72mm / 82mm / 105mm / 120mm
MOTOR TYPE Brush or Brushless
OUTPUT POWER 10W / 15W / 25W / 40W / 60W / 90W / 120 W / 140W / 180W / 200W / 300W(Can Be Customized)
OUTPUT SHAFT 8mm / 10mm / 12mm / 15mm ; Round Shaft, D-Cut Shaft, Key-Way Shaft (Can Be Customized)
Voltage type 12V,24V,48V
Accessories Electric Brake / Encoder
GEARBOX FRAME SIZE 32 mm / 42mm / 52mm / 62mm /72mm/82mm
Gear Ratio 3.65K-392.98K
Type Of Pinion GN Type / GU Type

Type Of Planetary Gear Motor

Other Products

Company Profile

 

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Application: Universal, Industrial, Household Appliances
Operating Speed: Constant Speed
Excitation Mode: Excited
Function: Control, Driving
Casing Protection: Closed Type
Type: Z2
Customization:
Available

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dc motor

How does the speed control of a DC motor work, and what methods are commonly employed?

The speed control of a DC (Direct Current) motor is essential for achieving precise control over its rotational speed. Various methods can be employed to regulate the speed of a DC motor, depending on the specific application requirements. Here’s a detailed explanation of how speed control of a DC motor works and the commonly employed methods:

1. Voltage Control:

One of the simplest methods to control the speed of a DC motor is by varying the applied voltage. By adjusting the voltage supplied to the motor, the electromotive force (EMF) induced in the armature windings can be controlled. According to the principle of electromagnetic induction, the speed of the motor is inversely proportional to the applied voltage. Therefore, reducing the voltage decreases the speed, while increasing the voltage increases the speed. This method is commonly used in applications where a simple and inexpensive speed control mechanism is required.

2. Armature Resistance Control:

Another method to control the speed of a DC motor is by varying the armature resistance. By inserting an external resistance in series with the armature windings, the total resistance in the circuit increases. This increase in resistance reduces the armature current, thereby reducing the motor’s speed. Conversely, reducing the resistance increases the armature current and the motor’s speed. However, this method results in significant power loss and reduced motor efficiency due to the dissipation of excess energy as heat in the external resistance.

3. Field Flux Control:

Speed control can also be achieved by controlling the magnetic field strength of the motor’s stator. By altering the field flux, the interaction between the armature current and the magnetic field changes, affecting the motor’s speed. This method can be accomplished by adjusting the field current through the field windings using a field rheostat or by employing a separate power supply for the field windings. By increasing or decreasing the field flux, the speed of the motor can be adjusted accordingly. This method offers good speed regulation and efficiency but requires additional control circuitry.

4. Pulse Width Modulation (PWM):

Pulse Width Modulation is a widely used technique for speed control in DC motors. It involves rapidly switching the applied voltage on and off at a high frequency. The duty cycle, which represents the percentage of time the voltage is on, is varied to control the effective voltage applied to the motor. By adjusting the duty cycle, the average voltage across the motor is modified, thereby controlling its speed. PWM provides precise speed control, high efficiency, and low power dissipation. It is commonly employed in applications such as robotics, industrial automation, and electric vehicles.

5. Closed-Loop Control:

In closed-loop control systems, feedback from the motor’s speed or other relevant parameters is used to regulate the speed. Sensors such as encoders or tachometers measure the motor’s actual speed, which is compared to the desired speed. The difference, known as the error signal, is fed into a control algorithm that adjusts the motor’s input voltage or other control parameters to minimize the error and maintain the desired speed. Closed-loop control provides excellent speed regulation and accuracy, making it suitable for applications that require precise speed control, such as robotics and CNC machines.

These methods of speed control provide flexibility and adaptability to various applications, allowing DC motors to be effectively utilized in a wide range of industries and systems.

dc motor

What role does commutation play in the operation of a DC motor?

In the operation of a DC (Direct Current) motor, commutation plays a crucial role in ensuring the continuous rotation of the motor and the conversion of electrical energy into mechanical motion. It is the process by which the direction of the current in the armature winding is periodically reversed to maintain a constant torque and facilitate the rotation of the motor. Here’s a detailed explanation of the role of commutation in the operation of a DC motor:

Commutation is necessary in a DC motor because the magnetic field generated by the armature winding needs to be constantly aligned with the stator’s magnetic field for efficient torque production. The stator of a DC motor typically consists of permanent magnets or electromagnets that create a fixed magnetic field. The armature winding, located on the rotor, produces a magnetic field that interacts with the stator’s field to generate torque.

The commutation process is achieved through the use of a commutator and brushes. The commutator is a cylindrical ring with multiple segments, while the brushes are conductive contacts that make physical contact with the commutator segments. The armature winding is connected to the commutator, and as the rotor spins, the brushes maintain contact with different segments.

As the rotor rotates, the commutator and brushes ensure that the direction of the current in the armature winding is reversed at specific intervals. This reversal of current flow is necessary to maintain a consistent torque in the same rotational direction. Without commutation, the torque generated by the motor would fluctuate in both magnitude and direction, leading to instability and erratic motor behavior.

The commutation process involves two stages: mechanical commutation and electrical commutation.

1. Mechanical Commutation: As the rotor rotates, the brushes make contact with different segments of the commutator. The segments are insulated from each other to prevent short circuits. When the brushes move from one segment to another, the current flowing through the armature winding is switched to a different coil or set of coils. This mechanical switching ensures that the magnetic fields produced by the winding are properly aligned with the stator’s field, resulting in continuous torque production.

2. Electrical Commutation: The reversal of current in the armature winding is achieved through electrical commutation. When the brushes make contact with a new commutator segment, the current flow in the winding is redirected to maintain the desired torque direction. The timing and sequence of the current reversal are critical to ensure smooth and efficient motor operation.

The commutation process in a DC motor is a dynamic and continuous operation. It allows for the conversion of electrical energy into mechanical motion by providing a consistent torque output. The efficiency and performance of the motor are greatly influenced by the quality and effectiveness of the commutation process.

In summary, commutation plays a vital role in the operation of a DC motor by ensuring the continuous rotation of the motor and the production of consistent torque. It involves the mechanical and electrical switching of the current direction in the armature winding, facilitated by the commutator and brushes.

dc motor

Can DC motors be used in robotics, and if so, what are some notable applications?

Yes, DC (Direct Current) motors can be used in robotics, and they are widely employed in various robotic applications. DC motors offer several advantages that make them suitable for robotic systems, including their controllability, compact size, and versatility. Here’s a detailed explanation of how DC motors are used in robotics and some notable applications:

DC Motors in Robotics:

DC motors are commonly used in robotics due to their ability to provide precise speed control and torque output. They can be easily controlled by adjusting the voltage applied to the motor, allowing for accurate and responsive motion control in robotic systems. Additionally, DC motors can be designed in compact sizes, making them suitable for applications with limited space and weight constraints.

There are two main types of DC motors used in robotics:

  1. DC Brushed Motors: These motors have a commutator and carbon brushes that provide the electrical connection to the rotating armature. They are relatively simple in design and cost-effective. However, they may require maintenance due to brush wear.
  2. DC Brushless Motors: These motors use electronic commutation instead of brushes, resulting in improved reliability and reduced maintenance requirements. They are often more efficient and offer higher power density compared to brushed motors.

Notable Applications of DC Motors in Robotics:

DC motors find applications in various robotic systems across different industries. Here are some notable examples:

1. Robotic Manipulators: DC motors are commonly used in robotic arms and manipulators to control the movement of joints and end-effectors. They provide precise control over position, speed, and torque, allowing robots to perform tasks such as pick-and-place operations, assembly, and material handling in industrial automation, manufacturing, and logistics.

2. Mobile Robots: DC motors are extensively utilized in mobile robots, including autonomous vehicles, drones, and rovers. They power the wheels or propellers, enabling the robot to navigate and move in different environments. DC motors with high torque output are particularly useful for off-road or rugged terrain applications.

3. Humanoid Robots: DC motors play a critical role in humanoid robots, which aim to replicate human-like movements and capabilities. They are employed in various joints, including those of the head, arms, legs, and hands, allowing humanoid robots to perform complex movements and tasks such as walking, grasping objects, and facial expressions.

4. Robotic Exoskeletons: DC motors are used in robotic exoskeletons, which are wearable devices designed to enhance human strength and mobility. They provide the necessary actuation and power for assisting or augmenting human movements, such as walking, lifting heavy objects, and rehabilitation purposes.

5. Educational Robotics: DC motors are popular in educational robotics platforms and kits, including those used in schools, universities, and hobbyist projects. They provide a cost-effective and accessible way for students and enthusiasts to learn about robotics, programming, and control systems.

6. Precision Robotics: DC motors with high-precision control are employed in applications that require precise positioning and motion control, such as robotic surgery systems, laboratory automation, and 3D printing. The ability of DC motors to achieve accurate and repeatable movements makes them suitable for tasks that demand high levels of precision.

These are just a few examples of how DC motors are used in robotics. The flexibility, controllability, and compactness of DC motors make them a popular choice in a wide range of robotic applications, contributing to the advancement of automation, exploration, healthcare, and other industries.

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editor by CX 2024-05-16