Product Description

 
 

Product Description

Company Profile

 

 

FAQ

Q:How to choose a multi-degree-of-freedom motion platform?
A: First, clarify the type of platform needed (degrees of freedom, simulation platform, positioning platform, swing platform, vibration platform, etc.). Next, determine the platform’s payload, followed by size requirements, and finally, specify the platform’s attitude data.

Q:What is the repeatability of a multi-degree-of-freedom motion platform?
A: Customization is done based on requirements. High-precision requirements generally belong to precision positioning platforms. Platforms with light loads and small volumes can achieve a repeatability of ±0.003mm.

Q:What is the resolution of a multi-degree-of-freedom motion platform?
A: Customization is done based on requirements. High-precision requirements generally belong to precision positioning platforms. Platforms with light loads and small volumes can achieve a repeatability resolution of 0.01mm, and after configuring sensors, accuracy can reach 0.001mm or higher for special requirements.

Q:Does a multi-degree-of-freedom motion platform require maintenance? How to maintain it?
A: Multi-degree-of-freedom motion platforms rarely require maintenance. After long periods of operation, they only need to be lubricated with a small amount of grease.

Q:What is the maximum effective load that a multi-degree-of-freedom motion platform can handle?
A: Standard platforms can handle loads of around 100 tons. For non-standard platforms, specific parameters need to be confirmed, and calculations and simulations are required for verification.

Q:What is the maximum angular position that a multi-degree-of-freedom motion platform can achieve?
A: The pitch and tilt angles of a conventional platform are within 35 degrees. Depending on the specific situation, these angles can be increased, but it is not recommended to exceed 40 degrees. The yaw angle can be larger but should preferably not exceed 45 degrees.

/* January 22, 2571 19:08:37 */!function(){function s(e,r){var a,o={};try{e&&e.split(“,”).forEach(function(e,t){e&&(a=e.match(/(.*?):(.*)$/))&&1

Application: Industrial
Speed: High Speed
Number of Stator: Single-Phase
Function: Driving, Control
Certification: ISO9001
Motor: Servo Motor
Customization:
Available

|

dc motor

What are the key differences between brushed and brushless DC motors?

Brushed and brushless DC motors are two distinct types of motors that differ in their construction, operation, and performance characteristics. Here’s a detailed explanation of the key differences between brushed and brushless DC motors:

1. Construction:

Brushed DC Motors: Brushed DC motors have a relatively simple construction. They consist of a rotor with armature windings and a commutator, and a stator with permanent magnets or electromagnets. The commutator and brushes make physical contact to provide electrical connections to the armature windings.

Brushless DC Motors: Brushless DC motors have a more complex construction. They typically consist of a stationary stator with permanent magnets or electromagnets and a rotor with multiple coils or windings. The rotor does not have a commutator or brushes.

2. Commutation:

Brushed DC Motors: In brushed DC motors, the commutator and brushes are responsible for the commutation process. The brushes make contact with different segments of the commutator, reversing the direction of the current through the armature windings as the rotor rotates. This switching of the current direction generates the necessary torque for motor rotation.

Brushless DC Motors: Brushless DC motors use electronic commutation instead of mechanical commutation. The commutation process is managed by an external electronic controller or driver. The controller determines the timing and sequence of energizing the stator windings based on the rotor position, allowing for precise control of motor operation.

3. Efficiency:

Brushed DC Motors: Brushed DC motors tend to have lower efficiency compared to brushless DC motors. This is primarily due to the energy losses associated with the brushes and commutation process. The friction and wear between the brushes and commutator result in additional power dissipation and reduce overall motor efficiency.

Brushless DC Motors: Brushless DC motors are known for their higher efficiency. Since they eliminate the use of brushes and commutators, there are fewer energy losses and lower frictional losses. The electronic commutation system allows for precise control of the motor’s operation, maximizing efficiency and reducing power consumption.

4. Maintenance:

Brushed DC Motors: Brushed DC motors require regular maintenance due to the wear and tear of the brushes and commutator. The brushes need periodic replacement, and the commutator requires cleaning to maintain proper electrical contact. The maintenance requirements contribute to additional costs and downtime for brushed DC motors.

Brushless DC Motors: Brushless DC motors have a relatively maintenance-free operation. As they do not have brushes or commutators, there is no need for brush replacement or commutator cleaning. This results in reduced maintenance costs and increased reliability of brushless DC motors.

5. Speed Control:

Brushed DC Motors: Brushed DC motors offer simpler speed control options. The speed can be controlled by adjusting the applied voltage or by varying the resistance in the armature circuit. This allows for relatively straightforward speed regulation.

Brushless DC Motors: Brushless DC motors provide more advanced and precise speed control capabilities. The speed can be controlled through the electronic commutation system by adjusting the timing and sequence of the stator windings’ energization. This allows for precise control of the motor’s speed and acceleration.

These key differences between brushed and brushless DC motors make each type suitable for different applications depending on factors such as efficiency requirements, maintenance considerations, and control complexity.

dc motor

How do DC motors compare to AC motors in terms of performance and efficiency?

When comparing DC (Direct Current) motors and AC (Alternating Current) motors, several factors come into play, including performance and efficiency. Here’s a detailed explanation of how DC motors and AC motors compare in terms of performance and efficiency:

1. Performance:

Speed Control: DC motors typically offer better speed control compared to AC motors. DC motors can be easily controlled by varying the voltage applied to the armature, allowing for precise and smooth speed regulation. On the other hand, AC motors rely on complex control methods such as variable frequency drives (VFDs) to achieve speed control, which can be more challenging and costly.

Starting Torque: DC motors generally provide higher starting torque compared to AC motors. The presence of a separate field winding in DC motors allows for independent control of the field current, enabling higher torque during motor startup. AC motors, especially induction motors, typically have lower starting torque, requiring additional starting mechanisms or devices.

Reversibility: DC motors offer inherent reversibility, meaning they can easily change their rotational direction by reversing the polarity of the applied voltage. AC motors, particularly induction motors, require more complex control mechanisms to achieve reversible operation.

Dynamic Response: DC motors have faster dynamic response characteristics compared to AC motors. They can quickly accelerate or decelerate, making them suitable for applications that require rapid changes in speed or precise control, such as robotics or servo systems.

2. Efficiency:

Full Load Efficiency: AC motors, especially three-phase induction motors, generally exhibit higher full load efficiencies compared to DC motors. This efficiency advantage is primarily due to the absence of commutation and the use of a rotating magnetic field in AC motors, which results in reduced energy losses and improved efficiency.

Partial Load Efficiency: DC motors can have higher efficiency at partial loads compared to AC motors. DC motors can be controlled by adjusting the armature voltage, allowing them to operate at reduced power while maintaining relatively high efficiency. AC motors, especially induction motors, may experience reduced efficiency at partial loads due to factors such as increased iron losses and reduced power factor.

Regenerative Braking: DC motors offer the advantage of regenerative braking, where the motor acts as a generator and converts kinetic energy into electrical energy during deceleration or braking. This regenerative braking capability allows for energy recovery, increasing overall system efficiency. AC motors typically require additional components or systems to achieve regenerative braking.

Power Factor: AC motors, when properly designed and operated, can have a power factor close to unity. This means that they draw relatively low reactive power from the electrical grid, resulting in improved power system efficiency. DC motors, on the other hand, may exhibit a lower power factor and require power factor correction measures if necessary.

In summary, DC motors and AC motors have their respective strengths and weaknesses in terms of performance and efficiency. DC motors excel in speed control, starting torque, reversibility, and dynamic response. AC motors, particularly three-phase induction motors, generally offer higher full load efficiency and power factor. However, DC motors can achieve higher efficiency at partial loads and have the advantage of regenerative braking. The choice between DC motors and AC motors depends on the specific application requirements, cost considerations, and the desired balance between performance and efficiency.

dc motor

Can DC motors be used in robotics, and if so, what are some notable applications?

Yes, DC (Direct Current) motors can be used in robotics, and they are widely employed in various robotic applications. DC motors offer several advantages that make them suitable for robotic systems, including their controllability, compact size, and versatility. Here’s a detailed explanation of how DC motors are used in robotics and some notable applications:

DC Motors in Robotics:

DC motors are commonly used in robotics due to their ability to provide precise speed control and torque output. They can be easily controlled by adjusting the voltage applied to the motor, allowing for accurate and responsive motion control in robotic systems. Additionally, DC motors can be designed in compact sizes, making them suitable for applications with limited space and weight constraints.

There are two main types of DC motors used in robotics:

  1. DC Brushed Motors: These motors have a commutator and carbon brushes that provide the electrical connection to the rotating armature. They are relatively simple in design and cost-effective. However, they may require maintenance due to brush wear.
  2. DC Brushless Motors: These motors use electronic commutation instead of brushes, resulting in improved reliability and reduced maintenance requirements. They are often more efficient and offer higher power density compared to brushed motors.

Notable Applications of DC Motors in Robotics:

DC motors find applications in various robotic systems across different industries. Here are some notable examples:

1. Robotic Manipulators: DC motors are commonly used in robotic arms and manipulators to control the movement of joints and end-effectors. They provide precise control over position, speed, and torque, allowing robots to perform tasks such as pick-and-place operations, assembly, and material handling in industrial automation, manufacturing, and logistics.

2. Mobile Robots: DC motors are extensively utilized in mobile robots, including autonomous vehicles, drones, and rovers. They power the wheels or propellers, enabling the robot to navigate and move in different environments. DC motors with high torque output are particularly useful for off-road or rugged terrain applications.

3. Humanoid Robots: DC motors play a critical role in humanoid robots, which aim to replicate human-like movements and capabilities. They are employed in various joints, including those of the head, arms, legs, and hands, allowing humanoid robots to perform complex movements and tasks such as walking, grasping objects, and facial expressions.

4. Robotic Exoskeletons: DC motors are used in robotic exoskeletons, which are wearable devices designed to enhance human strength and mobility. They provide the necessary actuation and power for assisting or augmenting human movements, such as walking, lifting heavy objects, and rehabilitation purposes.

5. Educational Robotics: DC motors are popular in educational robotics platforms and kits, including those used in schools, universities, and hobbyist projects. They provide a cost-effective and accessible way for students and enthusiasts to learn about robotics, programming, and control systems.

6. Precision Robotics: DC motors with high-precision control are employed in applications that require precise positioning and motion control, such as robotic surgery systems, laboratory automation, and 3D printing. The ability of DC motors to achieve accurate and repeatable movements makes them suitable for tasks that demand high levels of precision.

These are just a few examples of how DC motors are used in robotics. The flexibility, controllability, and compactness of DC motors make them a popular choice in a wide range of robotic applications, contributing to the advancement of automation, exploration, healthcare, and other industries.

China high quality Heavy-Duty DC Servo Motor with High Power Output for Manufacturing   vacuum pump distributorsChina high quality Heavy-Duty DC Servo Motor with High Power Output for Manufacturing   vacuum pump distributors
editor by CX 2024-04-30